Showing posts with label mathematics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mathematics. Show all posts

+Apple Dapple redux

Apple Dapple / ed logo

In 2014, I unveiled an independent 'numeracy complement to Reading Rainbow's literacy initiative' (and to a smaller extent, Mr. Wizard) called Apple Dapple. It was an app (supposedly, when apps were the big news) that lived inside a user's mobile device. Again, this was designed to be a mathematics pedagogical twin for Reading Rainbow's contemporary makeover (with career-based 'field trips' and everything). Back then I was asking for a substantial sum of money ($2million) to deliver the app to secondary schools across America (@ $10,000 per school district adoption, just like with Reading Rainbow).

Shout-out:

Looking back, I can see that it addressed a compulsory pedagogy need that was kind of already being met on public television outlets, as well as with various websites. The supplement was framed juvenily, because it was, well.. an activity meant for kids (gradeschoolers). My effort back then centered around exploiting a study (factoid) that correlated the effectiveness of teaching mathematics (ie. quantitative comprehension) in two stages: ages 8-11 (understanding shapes in relation to movement) and 16-17 (application of equations). Apple Dapple had been readied to bridge that gap.

Well, that was years ago. The app went into hibernation, ..and some other stuff. Now, I've learned a few things here and there about educational marketing (education is the biggest market in the world, especially when it's free), network advertising (ie. renting ad space), and streaming. I'm giving Apple Dapple another go (this time sans docent April Appleberry in the feature slot, for now, and with a new parent name - 'ed'*). It's been re-branded from a pure origami (ie. convertible geometries) platform (the lessons involved using paper-folding to understand trigonometric principles), into a standardized credentialing service (including certifications preparation+training) platform tailored to adult learners (andragogy) that will sit under my 'edUUe ("ed")' banner. Video🎞 content will be hyperlinked back-and-forth from a YouTube playlist and/or livestream (@LinkStarbureiy [
]). A student/teacher/coach helpdesk may utilize Google Classroom (get a Google Account if you don't already have one). There is still an abundance of attention placed on the progress and wellness of an individual, who in turn and without restriction, is able to advance at their own pace. Oh, yeah, the logo stays.🙂

Typically, in today's over-zealous world of timely product launches, people always emphasize how "excited" they are. As any educator can attest, curriculum planning is hard work, pupils can be rambunctious, and the pay could be better; hardly anything to get too "excited" about. But, I like to win.'ed' is the short form of 'edu'. Since the jukebox is named 'UUe', I thought about branding it 'UUedu', but there already exists a domain (uu.edu) that points to a real university, so that was out. I then tried 'edUUe' (and it did sound cool voicing the spelling) before truncating it to just 'ed'.

Note (+): I do not proctor exams.



Realizing that there is lots of competition out there in the vocational training space, I'm "curious" to see what kind of a dent I can make this time around. Nothing will be sold. I promised myself that I wouldn't overtax anybody trying to be super-innovative here. -- That's not to say that you can't count on machine learning being a huge factor in threading submitted queries. -- I simply want to see how far libre test preparation - mainly for STEM development / bug bounty programs / mathletics - can go if people know where to look (free or not, an education should pay off). That said, if you want to help out, donate some of your time and/or money. Thanks.

🐷tip


Wish me luck.

+how polym@th works here

There are some/other [massively] collaborative👥 domains across the WWW that are geared towards doing mathematics+computation innovation (what has been referred to as 'polym@th') in one (1) or more logs. I'm too lazy🤥 to pinpoint each one for this note, so I'll go ahead and make this portal/webpage (tree-dependence is negotiable) yet another place* for low-technology idea incubation.My aim is to make this the hub for such activity.

I should start by mentioning that just having a messaging💬 system is sufficient, but that can invite trouble when careless.🤢 To that end, please stay on-topic (pure/applied/recreational math-related); portions that are inadmissible face revocation👎🏿. All polym@th sourcings (hints, compiles, proofs, etc.) are tagged📎 under #polym@th (as opposed to #juking or #polymath), so any @replies from me (@Lnq) that are addressed to (specific members from) the community (ie. readers, etc.) will be placed in the post header. Pages are MathML-enabled, but the kicker is that, since I detest LaTeX!😖, such scripting (it might not parse, anyhow) in that syntax (rather, try to avoid Greek/Latin symbols wherever possible unless essential) is muted; points should be illustrated with (annotated) models [I favor 🖌Paint 3D/Builder at the moment, usually in tandem with a spreadsheet - but other 3d modelers should work as long as the file system🗃 is compatible]. Considering that we are iterating, sketches/pictures move the chain along much faster, anyways.😜That's just to say that I don't care for the coding element (MathJax noticeably slows load times); inherent math symbols in word processors are fine as long as they render.
Lastly, pay attention! Since things are organic and move at the speed of thought💭 here, you can expect a very large number of public domain threads. And yes👍🏿, posts may be bounced around between (third-party) forums.

#OpusSolve

Hodge conjecture

Let X be a non-singular complex projective manifold. Then every Hodge class on X is a linear combination with rational coefficients of the cohomology classes of complex subvarieties of X.

Story

Errata

Presented here are wrong/incorrect approaches to tackling the problem. These are offered as case studies of what to avoid.

+advancing the Millennium Prize Problems with Apple Dapple

It appears as though there hasn't been any real progress on Yang-Mills (mass gap) in over a decade (since 2004).  This problem, as well as the other five (5) [unresolved] problems known collectively as the Millenium Prize Problems (Clay), offer a reward of $1million for a solution that stands after two (2) years of scrutiny.  I imagine part of the bearing is that there is so much other fun stuff to work on in applied math, that pure math doesn't get the attention that it deserves.

I wonder what would happen if and when the bounty (or a percentage thereof) is matched and participants are actually given a deadline (?).  This is to say that if enough monies were raised with specific goals, would a crowdfund be the vehicle to expedite progress?  Only one way to find out; I'm initiating a crowdfunding campaign. .. but not for the Millennium Problems.  Instead, I want to focus on my large-scale education initiative, Apple Dapple.
http://edu.uuelco.me

We're looking to raise money and awareness for this on many different fronts, but the pot always boils down to the product, which, in this case, is an investment in the next generation.  We turn to the mathematics community to help sponsor either an individual (pupil) or a school district with the app that is to debut later this year.  So, in order to accomplish this, we'll game the MPP (i.e., put each Problem on an l-string and solve for the variables) full speed ahead.

Beginning February 2015, each Millennium Problem will be given fifty (50) days (approximately seven weeks) of attention, per. Although it is possible to have all of the Problems tackled simultaneously, only one (1) is reported at the end of a work period. This will happen in succession throughout calendar year 2015.

As stated, each Prize is offered at an award of $1million. We seek one-percent (1%) of that total amount.

[($1million x 0.01) x 6 = $60,000)]

This should be enough to supply six (6) school districts with the app.  Any surplus will also be factored.

http://edu.uuelco.me

Our aim here will be to standardize all elements of the remaining six (6) Millennium Prize Problems offered on behalf of the Clay Mathematics Institute (CMI).  These problems present their own subset(s) of potential applications to various string theoretic and computational geometry solutions. Each Problem has - over the years - had subtantial work done on it already, so there is no need to start from scratch. Instead, they can be gamed; a technique that should provide radical insight into what exactly needs to be computed. From there, it's just a matter of patchwork.  Of course, these solutions/standards will be added to the Trust as part of the UUe curriculum.

Birch-SwinnertonHodgeNavier-Stokes

PvNPRiemannYang-Mills
All solutions are to be published on the UUelcome Matte (ISSN 2165-6738) and archived with the Library of Congress.

http://edu.uuelco.me

+The Egglepple Company

The Egglepple Company (or just Egglepple) is the pseudonym given to what is now known as Egglepple (kindergarten). It was an incorporated@ business entity in various states throughout the United States of America prior to its deprecation, reorganization, and later inclusion into LES. Historically, Egglepple was the very first establishment to be a standalone/independent recreational mathematics+ enterprise (+:=contract-based, sometimes ghostwriting for academe from 10/2000 - 02/2001).Reference: Ohio Secretary of State's Office (also of interest The Stewart Ellis Company - Gobotech, #305)

Note (+): pm:=pure mathematics, am:=applied mathematics. (see Funshine/Toonlight)





"Egglepple" is the middle name of Link Egglepple Starbureiy, after whom the company is called, and by whom the entity was created. It spawned from the unincorporated/unorganized Egglepple Portfolio (for toy [puzzle] design, circa 1991).

Note (+): Nowadays, the 'company' portion is assumed to be my roster (of characters/personalities +gallery) and the yots.

Back at The Ohio State University, I put in my time roving the halls of the mathematics, physics/astronomy, and chemistry departments. I was fairly new in that world ("publish or perish") and really wasn't familiar with LaTeX and that publishing scheme back then (the departments certainly didn't make it easy for non-staff to have access to the system), so I did what I did best when it came to visual expression, I drew stuff up/wrote stuff down on napkins (yes, at times with wax crayons🖍️ or colored pencils✏️).

The astronomy department was awesome in the regard that they treated people who came through their doors respectfully. The math department, however, was the total opposite. There was so much ego (mine included) polluting the building that it was almost laughable, yet frustrating. Anyway, there would be these 'challenge' problems/help requests from the community (ie. intra-departmental) often posted on bulletins, offering modest bounties💵 (very short-term contracts) for their solutions. The opportunist in me would peel these from the boards, take them home, and come back shortly thereafter with my answer(s) written on (paperclipped🖇️) napkins. I remember just vagabonding off of those purses (yes, I was a 'bounty hunter') for periods at a time (sometimes in conjunction with all-levels math tutoring/coaching gigs). I guess that - in addition to responding to Michio Kaku's earlier proposition - was me (being the person responsible for) turning math into my version of a sport (, and thus, solidifying my interest in ctfs🏁).

+ed/PA

+ed/SRM

+ed/STAM

+ed/LTAM

+ed/IFM

+ed/FM

+ed/P

+ed/VEEAF

+ed/VEEE

+ed/VEEMS

+ed/ASA

+ed/CERA

+ed/FSA

+ed/math

+ed/actuary

MS E AF P FM
IFM LTAM STAM SRM PA

Syllabus: The Society of Actuaries (SOA) administers ten exams for credentialing. Each demands that the solver abandon rote thinking, and make practical use of mathematical modeling.

The Society is offering two sample exams (P and FM) with solutions at no charge for candidate support if you are interested in seeing what you are up against.

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